Tuesday, December 12, 2017

Google launches three new photography apps.

According Google research blog, each of the world's approximately two billion smartphone owners is carrying a camera capable of capturing photos and video of a tonal richness and quality unimaginable even five years ago. 

 Until recently, those cameras behaved mostly as optical sensors, capturing light and operating on the resulting image's pixels. 

The next generation of cameras, however, will have the capability to blend hardware and computer vision algorithms that operate as well on an image's semantic content, enabling radically new creative mobile photo and video applications.

Today Google launches a three  new photo apps – as part of new series of what it has dubbed photography “appsperiments.” he apps, some of which are available on both the iOS App Store and Google Play, give Google a way to test out more experimental features to see how users respond, the company explains in an announcement on its Google Research blog.




The apps involve a number of technologies now in development at Google, including those focused on object recognition, person segmentation, style algorithms, efficient image encoding and decoding technologies, Google says.

Specifically, that the three photographic apps in question are called Storyboard, Selfissimo!, and Scrubbies.

The functions of the first, Storyboard, is to turns videos into single-page comic layouts on your mobile device. uses the concept of turning photos into images as an inspired work of  art – also integrated includes comic book art –which is something that grew popular with the launch of the Artificial Intelligence.

 While that company has more recently shifted focus to b2b, its consumer app still ranks in the top 150 in the Photo & Video category on the App Store. But attention for this sort of creative photography has waned a bit. Perhaps turning it on for video could bring it back to the limelight again?

The Storyboard app is a new take on those art-inspired photo effects . Instead of turning a photo into comic book art, it automatically selects interesting frames from a video then lays them out using one of six visual styles.

Google Storyboard app is only available on Android devices - for now. and you can download it here

The Google second app, Selfissimo!, is designed for selfies, just like it's name implies.

In this case, the app is an automated selfie photographer that takes black and white photos of you every time you pose. Whenever you stop moving, a new photo is taken. The end result is a contact sheet of photos – like you’d have from a real photoshoot. 



This Google app is made available for both iOS and Android users, and you can easily get it here.

The third Google app is called Scrubbies, and is specially designed for video. This app will allow you to change the direction and acceleration of video playback effect in other to create looping videos. Instead of looping apps like Instagram’s Boomerang, Google Scrubbies does it all.

 You actually swipe on the video itself to “remix” it. Google describes this process as “scratching it like a D.J.” One finger plays the video, while two fingers captures the playback for you to save and share.

Is this the first time the first time for Google to launch an experimental photography apps like this ? let find out.

Google researchers developed Motion Stills to make iOS’s Live Videos less shaky, then brought a variation of that app to Android to offer a new recording experience for shooting sharable clips. This same Live Photo editing technology was also baked into the main Google Photos app, after some initial testing.

That means it’s possible that – if all goes well with the new app experiments – the features they offer could eventually make their way to Google Photos, as well.


Google also hinted that these three apps may be the first of many tests to – the company tells us they’re the “first installment” in a series of “apps periments.”

1 comment:

  1. Always looking for better photography on my phone, thanks.

    ReplyDelete